436
15 Apr 14 at 4 am

Abandoned girl Chang Ling Kuen on the streets shortly before being picked up by a policeman. She is eventually adopted by a couple from Brockton, Massachusetts and renamed Lori Chang Samuelson. By Dennis Stock, 1959.

Abandoned girl Chang Ling Kuen on the streets shortly before being picked up by a policeman. She is eventually adopted by a couple from Brockton, Massachusetts and renamed Lori Chang Samuelson. By Dennis Stock, 1959.

More fascinating stories, In case you aren’t aware of it, the tiger skin is still on the wall of Stanley Tin Hau Temple today ; ) 

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Yes I know this picture is from Shatin, the Stanley one is on the wall in the temple waiting for you to visit with your own eyes. 

"There are lovely birds on the Peak, among them some hawks, a blue magpie, a quail, and an Indian partridge called the francolin, which cries, "Come to the Peak, ha! ha!" on nearly every slope on every day. The most noteworthy animal is the barking deer, which doesn’t’ bark much as moo, or call plaintively like a bird. There is a rhesus monkey, and a tiger was killed on Hongkong Island right after Japanese took the place, by a guard at Stanley Camp. This was so unusual that people surmised the tiger had been flushed in the New Territories, and scared into swimming the harbor by Japanese troops shooting their way down in the invasion."

《赤柱之虎 廣東南下游水過海》 從前,在赤柱長大的孩子,都知道馬坑村天后廟內掛着一塊神秘的獸皮。孩子戰戰兢兢的推開廟門,躡手躡腳走到廟裏一角,仰望那塊被年月和香火熏得漆黑的獸皮,想像那究竟是甚麼怪獸。今時今日,赤柱的孩子已沒有那樣的想像空間,因為赤柱早已成為旅遊景點,獸皮也附上清楚說明,那是1942年命喪赤柱的一頭老虎遺下的皮囊。

遭亞星先生警署前射殺 根據赤柱街坊福利會的記載:「該虎原體重240磅,身長73英寸,高3英尺,於1942年在赤柱警署門前被一名印度裔警員亞星先生所射殺。」文中所說的赤柱警署,應是現已變成超級市場的舊赤柱警署。舊赤柱警署建於1859年,早期是港島最南端的前哨站,戰略位置重要,常供警隊、英軍聯合使用。1942香港正值第二次世界大戰的日治時期,日治期間日軍曾徵用赤柱警署作分區總部。 今天「赤柱之虎」毛皮上的虎紋已難以辨認,但那年月不少華南虎會由廣東南下,來到氣候較暖的新界郊區甚至九龍過冬。老虎又是游泳高手,可以游到港島登岸。這頭老虎來到港島最南端的漁村,卻成為最後一頭在香港被獵殺的老虎。 當年任教香港大學生物學系的 Geoffrey Herklots在淪陷期間,遭日軍囚禁在赤柱集中營。他撰寫的《 Hong Kong Countryside》描述,曾聽過老虎夜間闖入集中營的菜園,也見過類似老虎的爪印,守衞深夜巡邏時因此非常緊張,甚至曾向誤作老虎的囚犯開槍。後來傳來老虎被殺的消息,但赤柱的村民都難以置信老虎可以游泳過海,認為牠是馬戲班逃出來的老虎。 至於射殺赤柱之虎的亞星先生,英文名是 Rur Singh。傳說他晚年曾重臨舊地,憑弔虎皮,但是真是假,已無從稽考。

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The Cafe de Chine is in the centre of downtown, looking out from tis rooftop not toward the harbor but inward, at the front of Victoria Peak. The oldest part of town is on that hillside, built in the time of sedan chairs, before autos and roads had spread things. It is a nice prospect. The hill bulges out convexly. The buildings rise steeply, their facades above each other. They are in old colors - gray, pale yellow, fade brick, mottled. The composition has layer on layer of verandas interspersed with rows of dark windows - oblong, round-arched, Gothic-arched, all with shutters; there are railings and outside stairways; it is like a strange Palladian dream. Midway up the Peak the buildings stop; the slope there is too steep; then comes wild greenery - and on that day the whole thing vanished upward into mist, vaguely like heights in a Sung Dynasty painting.  
Photo source: The Photo Collection of Queen’s College, p.8. 

Another fascinating book written in the 1950s, this writer must be a colour-lover. 

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At first the Hongkong islands blended with the mainland. The whole thing was vague and moist-looking, light green, with clouds and blue sky mingling indefinitely above it. It was usual summer weather. As we get closer I saw that the tops of Hongkong Island’s peaks were lost in a wet gray cloud, and I knew big houses up there, away from the city’s noise, would be blind and dripping clothes and books mildew there if neglected for a moment; the houses have dry-storage rooms with stoves kept lit.

We got into Hong Kong waters and passed Wanglan Light, which looks on the South China Sea from a rock and was one of the key restoration jobs after the war. A Hong Kong paper not long ago called the lighthouse the “most modern in the world”; anyway, it sparkled wonderfully in whitewash that morning. There were some junks round it in the blue water. We passed it and saw Sheko, a small preserve on Hong Kong Island’s east end for taipans, top European businessmen; their houses stood out oddly from the green landscape. Next to it we saw Big Wave Bay, with a ribbon of clean dun beach, and on the headland next to that – Cape Collinson – an army camp, with Nissen huts. We rounded that cape, taking it on our left, and confronted the bay called Sai Wan, had grown larger. The flimsy little weather-beaten huts there fascinated our navigator. “Extraordinary,” he said. “They look like crates.” They did. They looked like piano-boxes.

[…] And then we faced the city. A dark cloud-mass brooded on Victoria Peak, which rises right above it. The sides of the Peak were smoky gray-green in that light; the city struggled up them, chiefly apartments and taipans’ house on the higher levels, different off-whites in color.

A hole broke in the cloud, and a bit of Peak-flank showed bright emerald, with the houses glistening. Junk sails were moving to and fro in the foreground, and the water was flat and green (sometimes it is deep blue, sometimes gray).

Two Peak trams were in motion on their track from the city to the top – it looked vertical from our angle. One was going up, one coming down, at either end of their cable, like clock weights. That is the principle they work on, their answer to the steepness.

Big ships were in the harbor by the dozens. One, an American President liner, was tied up on the Kowloon side to the right. Others were anchored in midstream, and some had lightering junks clustered round them like nursing puppies. Ferries, launches, sampans, tugs, and other junks piled back and forth.

We moored to a buoy near Kellett Island, the site of the Royal Hong Kong Yacht Club. […] 

I went out later that morning to look at thigns and pay some calls… […] Chinese women especially are nice to look at here. The fashionable ones are nearly always slim; they wear bright silk slim dresses in Chinese style, with high collars, and slits in the skirt sides. Poor women wear deftly tailored trousers and jackets, and have thick gloosy black pigtails down their backs; the backs give a feeling of grace and spring, the effect partly, I believe, of jacket and pigtail, but also of the hard work Chinese women do, and the poise it gives them. 

[…] Coolies wear Chinese pajama-suits; in hot weather they favor a shiny black material called fragrant cloud linen. They chant to keep time when they carry things, and this blends with the traffic noise, which otherwise is like that of any city. 

[…] Reuters is a news agency, but in Hongkong it is also an unofficial club, a gathering place, for correspondents. Its facilities are gladly made free for all. The man ultimately behind this Christmas mood is a broad, gray-haired Irishman named Bill O’Neill, who has been in the Far East two or three decades, who once walked fifty miles in a day near the Lower Yangtze, and who is worshipped by everyone in Hong Kong fro among other things, his behavior when interned by the Japanese at Stanley Camp. 

Reuters is a news agency, but in Hongkong it is also an unofficial club, a gathering place, for correspondents. Its facilities are gladly made free for all. The man ultimately behind this Christmas mood is a broad, gray-haired Irishman named Bill O’Neill, who has been in the Far East two or three decades, who once walked fifty miles in a day near the Lower Yangtze, and who is worshipped by everyone in Hong Kong for among other things, his behavior when interned by the Japanese at Stanley Camp. 

We drank some tea and chatted in the quiet old high ceilinged office. Reuters is in one of Hongkong’s early downtown buildings, which run almost twenty feet between ceilings and floors, and which are sometimes paneled in hand-carved teak. In the war the office was used as a Japanese torture chamber, and the night desk-man still hears ghostly cries and moans.

 9
03 Apr 14 at 11 am

1903年的灣仔,想不到香港早期的鹹魚市場,是跟日本息息相關的。

1903年的灣仔,想不到香港早期的鹹魚市場,是跟日本息息相關的。
 6
03 Apr 14 at 11 am

Queen’s Road East used to look SO serene… back in the 1950s! I’m shocked! 1950年代中後期皇后大道東相, 右邊是從萬茂里口望向永豐街口, 左邊可見昔日有很多樟木槓店, 直至1970年代初, 依然約有十間在左邊路旁, 1972年卻忽然全部結業

Queen’s Road East used to look SO serene… back in the 1950s! I’m shocked! 1950年代中後期皇后大道東相, 右邊是從萬茂里口望向永豐街口, 左邊可見昔日有很多樟木槓店, 直至1970年代初, 依然約有十間在左邊路旁, 1972年卻忽然全部結業
 19
30 Mar 14 at 7 am

灣仔機利臣街街市 1970s
啲柑好靚 : ) 

灣仔機利臣街街市 1970s啲柑好靚 : ) 
 5
30 Mar 14 at 7 am

Top: 1920年安樂的薑啤

Bottom: 1890年至1910年,當時流行俗稱炮彈樽(Torpedo Bottle),因樽身成欖型及尖底而得其名。此外,樽面還刻有公司資料、牌子及一些商標圖案、全透明凸字,樽咀型也頗特別和厚,俗稱豬咀(Blob Top),而這種樽咀係配用特別的水松木塞封蓋..
好靚

Source: http://www.weshare.hk/madamebianca/articles/758162

(Source: maoshan)

 27
30 Mar 14 at 6 am

1957莊士敦道「 50年代灣仔戰後重建,樓房如雨後春筍, 新的樓宇多下舖上居,門面及騎樓底都會掛上招牌, 寫得一手好字的書生才子不愁沒出路, 部份更能書寫英文」好似賣字

1957莊士敦道「 50年代灣仔戰後重建,樓房如雨後春筍, 新的樓宇多下舖上居,門面及騎樓底都會掛上招牌, 寫得一手好字的書生才子不愁沒出路, 部份更能書寫英文」好似賣字
 52
22 Mar 14 at 12 pm

Queen’s Road On Chinese New Years Day, Hong Kong 1902

Queen’s Road On Chinese New Years Day, Hong Kong 1902
 59
22 Mar 14 at 10 am

卑利街士丹頓街與荷李活道間一段 - really like the lady’s dress

卑利街士丹頓街與荷李活道間一段 - really like the lady’s dress
 17
22 Mar 14 at 10 am

睇舊報紙,偶然讀會讀到夜駕人士連人帶車不慎衝落海的慘事,但依然覺得這樣子的海濱很美。: ) 
告士打道 1940

睇舊報紙,偶然讀會讀到夜駕人士連人帶車不慎衝落海的慘事,但依然覺得這樣子的海濱很美。: ) 告士打道 1940
 17
22 Mar 14 at 8 am

Central, c. 1896. stairs look as if they were freshly made

Central, c. 1896. stairs look as if they were freshly made
 20
22 Mar 14 at 8 am

當你每次以為已經看遍那區的舊相,卻總仍能發現更多。中環城隍街,從堅道往下望。

當你每次以為已經看遍那區的舊相,卻總仍能發現更多。中環城隍街,從堅道往下望。
 66
22 Mar 14 at 7 am

上環東街 1971 so different. 

Tung Street, Sheung Wan

上環東街 1971 so different. 
Tung Street, Sheung Wan